Crystal Young-Otterstrom 268.20sc

Crystal Young-Otterstrom's activity stream


  • published Creative Vitality Suite in Membership 2019-08-16 13:10:05 -0600

    Creative Vitality Suite

    Measure the Impact of the Arts in Your Economy

    • Through a unique partnership between the Utah Cultural Alliance and the Western States Arts Federation, Community Organization Members receive free access to WESTAF’s Cultural Vitality Suite . . an online tool providing national, high-quality creative economy data and reporting.

     

           

                                                           

    What is CVSuite?

    • The Creative Vitality™ Suite (CVSuite™) is an online creative sector data tool designed to measure the economic impact of the creative sector at the regional, state, and local levels. The CVSuite aggregates the most current, cleaned, and vetted data from national sources. Our creative economy data includes the number of jobs, earnings, revenues, wages, the concentration of jobs, and more. The tool also contains demographic data on race, ethnicity, and age for all geographic areas.

    Use CVSuite to...

    1. Measure progress in your creative sector using current and historical data.
    2. Analyze all classifications of workers, including the self-employed and extended proprietors, who are often difficult to identify.
    3. Compare your region’s creative vitality to the nation and other peer regions. 
    4. Gain insights on inclusivity, equity, and the age distribution in the creative workforce.
    5. Customize the occupation and industry codes for a broad or detailed analysis on the cultural sector.

     

    Demonstrate Economic Impact With Facts

    • CVSuite users can analyze the local creative sector to support a variety of research and conduct exploratory and comparative analyses. The results are quantifiable and accessible through downloadable reports and spreadsheets. With new insights, arts organizations can effectively advocate for funding, communicate the value of art and economic development partnerships, and measure the impacts of cultural development initiatives.

     

     

    Be Smart With the Leading Data on the Creative Economy

    • The CVSuite works with economists and empirical data sources to provide the most detailed creative economy data available. Access 98 creative industry codes and 85 creative occupations for in-depth discipline analyses. Here are a few of our data sources:

         

                        


  • Stephen Handy // State Representative District 16 // Grade: B-

    Stephen Handy // State Representative District 16 // Grade: B-

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  • Aspen Perry // Holladay City Council District 4 // Grade: A

    Aspen Perry // Holladay City Council District 4 // Grade: A

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  • David Garbett // Salt Lake City Mayor // Grade: B+

    David Garbett // Salt Lake City Mayor // Grade: B+

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  • Tricia Pilny // Layton Mayor // Grade: A

    Tricia Pilny // Layton Mayor // Grade: A

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  • donated 2019-04-08 14:31:39 -0600

  • signed Save BYU's Amanda Knight Hall 2018-11-02 08:00:24 -0600

    Save BYU's Amanda Knight Hall

    Amanda Knight Hall Petition

    SAVE AMANDA KNIGHT HALL FROM DEMOLITION

    TO: BYU Administration

    FROM: Provo Joaquin Neighborhood Chair and Vice-Chairs, Utah Cultural Alliance, Preservation Utah, and the Following Signers

    We are members of Utah-focused cultural organizations, Provo residents, BYU friends and alumni, and concerned citizens. 

    This summer, Brigham Young University announced the demolition of the Tudor-Revival Amanda Knight Hall (built 1939), located in Provo’s historic Joaquin Neighborhood. The University plans to replace the original Amanda Knight Hall with a “replica” of the building located on the same site. 

    We ask that BYU reverse its decision to demolish Amanda Knight Hall, and instead either renovate the building for university use OR sell the building to a preservation-minded investor.

    366 signatures

    Background*

    Jessie and Amanda Knight were patrons of BYU who, in the early twentieth-century, repeatedly saved Brigham Young Academy, and subsequently Brigham Young University, from bankruptcy. Using funds donated to BYU by Jessie and Amanda Knight in their wills, the university built Amanda Knight Hall to serve as a woman’s dormitory and as a memorial to Amanda Knight. After serving for decades as a dormitory, Amanda Knight Hall was repurposed in 1964 to be a training center for foreign-bound LDS missionaries. The programs developed in Amanda Knight Hall gave birth to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints worldwide Missionary Training Center program, and were, in part, responsible for the meteoric growth of the LDS Church during the latter half of the twentieth century. 

    Since its construction, Amanda Knight Hall has been an important BYU and Provo City landmark. In 1996, members of the Provo Landmarks Commission notified BYU that they had placed the building on the Provo Landmarks Register, effectively saving the building from demolition. While BYU did not contest Amanda Knight Hall’s listing in 1996, in 2002 BYU petitioned Provo City Council to remove the building from the registry so they could tear it down. Acting contrary to the recommendation of the Landmarks Commission, the City Council voted to delist the building. The uproar this action caused lead BYU to back down from its plans to demolish Amanda Knight Hall. 

    In June of 2018, BYU stated that they had renewed their plans to demolish Amanda Knight Hall. By taking this action, BYU not only demolishes a key part of its own history, but also a significant piece of Provo City and larger Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints histories. This historic building will soon disappear unless BYU can be persuaded to renovate the building for its own uses OR sell the building to a preservation-minded investor. 

    Please sign this petition directed at BYU Administration in support of preserving Amanda Knight Hall. Your efforts on behalf of this preservation effort are greatly appreciated.  

    *Visit the “Save Amanda Knight Hall at BYU” Facebook page for additional information.

    Add signature

  • Rex Shipp // Republican // Utah House of Representatives District 72 (A-)

    Rex Shipp // Republican // Utah House of Representatives District 72 (A-)

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  • donated 2019-02-26 17:45:42 -0700

  • signed NEA, NEH, CPB, & IMLS Petition 2018-02-12 15:15:33 -0700

    Save the NEA, NEH, CPB, and IMLS!

    Well, here we are again.

    President Trump once again has proposed to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting AND the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

    This cannot stand.

    While they've tried to cut culture before, this is now the second time a President's budget has called to zero out these important institutions. (The first time being President Trump's attempt last year).

    The arts, humanities, and public broadcasting are a significant contributor to Utah's economic success.

    • As cultural businesses, we employ over 79,000 Utahns and generate over $3.5 billion in earnings (data as of 2015).
    • We are the #1 state in the country for arts participation. Our audiences go out to eat, travel, stay in hotels, pay for parking, and are generating even more money for Utah's economy.
    • Utah arts organizations receive around $1.6 million from the National Endowment for the Arts
    • Utah cultural organizations receive around $700,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
    • $9,400,410 million dollars comes annually to Utah thanks to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (source). KRCL receives $100,000 annually. KUER receives $280,000. KBYU receives $3,529,354 in a combination for its TV, radio, and other services. About 18 percent of KUED's budget, or $1,702,498, comes from CPB. KUED delivers $8,133,498 in total services. For every dollar appropriated to KUED via the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Utahns receive $4.78 in services. The cost to tax payers for these services comes to 57 cents a year. For a complete list of Utah stations receiving support from CPB, click here.
    • That $11.7 million in federal funding for Utah organizations is a significant part of our success.


    ** National Arts & Humanities Advocacy Day is Tuesday March 13, 2018. We will hand deliver your signatures to Utah's federal delegation as part of our meetings in DC! **

    741 signatures

    Dear Senator Hatch, Senator Lee, Congressman Bishop, Congressman Stewart, Congressman Curtis, and Congresswoman Love:

    President Trump is the first president in American history to propose eliminating the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). We thank you for working last year to preserve these important entities, and we ask you to work to support them again.

    Arts, humanities, museums, libraries, and public broadcasting are a significant contributor to Utah's economic success.

    • As cultural businesses, we employ over 79,000 Utahns and generate over $3.6 billion in earnings (data as of 2015).
    • Utah is the #1 state in the country for arts participation. Our audiences go out to eat, travel, stay in hotels, pay for parking, and are generating even more money for Utah's economy.
    • Utah arts organizations receive around $1.6 million from the National Endowment for the Arts
    • Utah cultural organizations receive around $700,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
    • $9,400,410 million dollars comes annually to Utah thanks to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (source). KRCL receives $100,000 annually. KUER receives $280,000. KBYU receives $3,529,354 in a combination for its TV, radio, and other services. About 18 percent of KUED's budget, or $1,702,498, comes from CPB. KUED delivers $8,133,498 in total services. For every dollar appropriated to KUED via the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Utahns receive $4.78 in services. The cost to tax payers for these services comes to 57 cents a year. For a complete list of Utah stations receiving support from CPB, click here.
    • That $11.7 million in federal funding for Utah organizations is a significant part of our success.

    These federal dollars are controlled locally. Indeed, NEA is the only federal program with a state partnership in which 40% of the NEA budget is given directly to state arts agencies. State arts agencies, such as our Utah Division of Arts and Museums, receives the bulk of these dollars and re-grants it out to cultural organizations all over the state. National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities represent the only federal granting agencies that distribute funds to organizations in ALL congressional districts.

    Utah has a rich tradition of supporting the arts and humanities in our state. We ask you to represent the majority of Utahns who support funding for the arts, humanities, and public broadcasting. Culture is part of who we are as a state. Every dollar from the federal government represents a $9 boost to the economy.

    Culture WORKS. As your constituents, we urge you to support arts, humanities, and public broadcasting.

    Add signature

  • signed Petition: LCSD Art Collection 2018-01-08 13:42:45 -0700

    Petition: Save Logan City School District's Art Collection

    Help us Save the Logan City School District Art Collection

    Utah is home to this country's oldest Arts Council, founded by state legislator Alice Merrill Horne. We celebrated her 150th birthday on January 2nd. Her passion for the arts & humanities was unbridled, and in the 1930s, Alice Merrill Horne helped 37 school districts and libraries across the state begin their own collections of original artworks by regional artists. The investment started with milk money - nickels and dimes - contributed by school children which was matched by city, county and state funds to purchase collections that are now worth millions of dollars. The Logan City School District's collection is still publicly owned and displayed, for now. However, LCSD is now selling 11 of the finest paintings from their collection.

    Because these pieces were purchased by children for the public good of future students to enjoy, they should remain in public collections and viewable by the descendants of these children, for the public benefit of all Utahns. We, the signers of this petition, ask the Logan City School District to immediately halt the sale of their collection and work to find a solution that keeps the collection accessible to the public and properly preserved and stored.

    We ask LCSD to also consider the terrible timing of this sale: Cache County recently made international news for firing an art teacher for showing children art, and, it is Alice Merrill Horne's 150th birthday month.

    Keep these pieces public. Take care of these historical treasures for future generations.


    Residents of Logan:

     

    Please also contact your School District representative immediately! 

     

    Click here for contact information: http://www.loganschools.org/school-board-1/

     

    Visit vote.utah.gov to find how which Logan City school district representative

     

    There is a school board meeting on Tuesday January 23rd at 5pm, you are welcome to attend and ask them in person not to sell the pieces. 101 West Center Street, Logan, Utah 

     


    Below is the petition text.

    833 signatures

    Dear Logan City School District and Superintendent Schofield:

    It is empowering to know that the community of Logan, especially its children, understood the value of art by purchasing art, which not only allowed them to be surrounded by great art, but helped them build cultural knowledge and experience.

    We, the undersigned individuals and institutions, are dismayed over your decision to sell pieces from this "milk money for art" collection. We ask you to immediately halt the sale of your collection and work to find a solution that keeps the collection:

    1. accessible to the public and,
    2. properly preserved and stored. 

    Possible solutions include donating or loaning the pieces to a local museum such as:

    • Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art
    • Logan City's new Library
    • The new Logan History Museum could be expanded to include art
    • Utah Museum of Fine Arts
    • Springville Museum of Art
    • Capitol Preservation Board
    • Donating to the Utah Division of Arts & Museums

    The loan to these publicly entities could include the entity funding any necessary restoration work.

    Because these pieces were purchased by children for the public good of future students to enjoy, they should remain in public collections and viewable by the descendants of these children, for the public benefit of all Utahns.

    We ask LCSD to also consider the terrible timing of this sale: Cache County recently made international news for firing an art teacher for showing children art, and, it is Alice Merrill Horne's 150th birthday month right now.

    The legacy of genuine art purchased by school children for public viewing is pretty incredible. Please keep these pieces public. Take care of these treasures for future generations. 

     

    Signed,

    the following individuals and institutions

    Add signature

  • signed Save Classical 89 Petition 2017-10-25 00:07:07 -0600

    Save Classical 89!

    14,350 signatures

    Help us save Classical 89, KBYU 89.1!

    In a world full of darkness and tragedy, Classical 89 heals wounds and lifts souls through the power of music. Classical 89 is the sole classical music radio option in Utah. For many of us, the loss of Classical 89 is tantamount to losing a friend. We must have Classical 89 to preserve the importance of this kind of music for future generations. Utah's cultural scene is varied and renowned and yet the loss of a classical music station is unfathomable. Classical 89 is one of the nation's top classical radio stations. We need it for Utah, and we need it to be available to its listeners around the world.

    Classical 89 is a keystone of Utah's arts and humanities sector. Together as cultural businesses, we employ over 51,000 Utahns, generate over $3 billion in earnings, and have more private music teachers per capita than any other state. Indeed, our state supports many musical nonprofits: Utah Symphony | Utah Opera; Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre in Logan; Moab Music Festival in Moab; dozens of chamber music groups such as Nova Chamber Music and Intermezzo Chamber Music Series; even a group that champions music by Utah composers, Salty Cricket Composers Collective; choral groups such as Utah Chamber Artists and SL Choral Artists; regional orchestras such as Timpanogos Symphony and Utah Valley Symphony; and much, much more.

    We ask you, Michael Dunn and all decision makers at BYU Broadcasting, to listen to the requests of the thousands of listeners who want 89.1 to remain as primarily classical music programming. 

    (If you have signed any of the other Classical 89 petitions such as this or this, you don't need to sign this one because we have decided to combine forces!)

    Thank you for considering our request,

     

    The boards and staff of Utah Cultural Alliance, Utah Cultural Advocacy Alliance, Utah Federation of Music Clubs, and,
    the undersigned individuals and organizations.

    (If you would like to add your organization's name as a formal signer of this petition, please contact [email protected])

    Add signature

  • signed School Board Petition 2017-09-16 17:48:26 -0600

    School Board Petition

    4,836 signatures

    School Board Petition: Bring back the Middle School Arts, Health, and PE Credit Requirement



    To: Members of the Utah State Board of Education
    From: Utah Cultural Alliance, Utah Education Association, Utah Music Teachers Association, and the following signers

    We are parents, voters, and Utahns who care about the success of our state’s children. We know that a well-rounded education is vital to their future.

    As your constituents, we ask you to reverse your August 4th decision to remove the Middle School credit requirement for health, arts, physical education, college and career awareness, world languages, and digital literacy.

    The benefits to children of a well-rounded education that includes arts, health, and PE education are many:

    1. Better academic results, better workforce opportunities, and more civic engagement, especially for at-risk children. (1)
    2. Improved performance and grades in reading, math, writing, and other subjects. (2)
    3. Increased creative thinking and problem solving. (3)
    4. Increased positive attitudes towards school and learning. (4)
    5. Less aggression and violent tendencies. (5)
    6. Improved cognitive ability. (6)
    7. Improved community cohesion. (7)
    8. Improved graduation rates. (8)
    9. Improved motor skills and self-discipline. (9)
    10. Improved social interaction. (10)
    11. Improved mental health and dietary choices. (11)

    Eliminating the credit requirement for arts, health, physical education, college and career awareness, world languages, and digital literacy suggests that state standards and oversight for these vital programs could disappear. These are subject areas that are proven to close the school achievement gap. Lack of standards and oversight prevents fair and equitable services statewide, and puts at risk our State’s commitment to ensure that a healthy and productive generation is ready to lead our future.

    We thank the six board members who voted against this change: Janet Cannon, Brittney Cummins, Jennifer Graviet, Carol Barlow-Lear, Kathleen Riebe, and Spencer Stokes.

    Utah is a wonderful place to live, work, and raise families. We believe that our state public education system should be a light to the rest of America and the world. When policy changes occur that negatively affect children’s education -- such as this credit change -- our state educational system suffers, and our children suffer. We ask you to reverse your August 4th decision.

    Sincerely,

    The board and staff of the Utah Cultural Alliance, Utah Education Association, Utah Music Teachers Association, and the undersigned.

    Sources:

    1. https://www.arts.gov/file/2684

    2. A 2002 report by the Arts Education Partnership revealed that schoolchildren exposed to drama, music and dance are often more proficient at reading, writing, and math. & The 2006 Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum study on art education showed a link between arts education and improved literacy skills. & A 2011 study called “Reinvesting in Arts Education” found that integrating arts with other subjects can help raise achievement levels. & Active Education: Physical Education, Physical Activity and Academic Performance. & An Evaluation of the Relationship between Academic Performance and Physical Fitness Measures in California Schools

    3. A study (http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/champions/pdfs/Learning.pdf) of more than 2,000 middle-school students by researchers at Columbia University found that students who had participated in at least three years of in-school arts instruction scored significantly higher on an instrument measuring creative thinking and that these students self- reported much higher rates of positive attitudes towards school and learning than did their peers who had experienced less arts education.

    4. Same study as 1.
    5. Evaluation of a six-month program that involved youth in drama reported that these participants demonstrated less aggressive and violent tendencies, while also exhibiting more pro-social behaviors like cooperation and self control compared to before participating. http://www.traumacenter.org/products/pdf_files/jsv5_2_2006.pdf & A study of Missouri public schools in 2010 found that greater arts education led to fewer disciplinary infractions and higher attendance, graduation rates and test scores.

    6. A study by research kinesiologists found that students showed improved cognitive ability after participating in moderate exercise. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306452209001171 & A meta-analysis that took into account 44 studies that had sought to identify correlations & between physical activity among children and their cognitive performance concluded that there is a significant relationship. & The Association Between School-Based Physical Activity, Including Physical Education, and Academic Performance

    7. A 2005 report by the Rand Corporation called “A Portrait of the Visual Arts” argues that art education does more than just give students a creative outlet. It can actually help connect them to the larger world, ultimately improving community cohesion.

    8. The Center for Arts Education published a report in 2009 that suggests arts education may improve graduation rates.

    9. http://www.phitamerica.org/Page1139.aspx & Physical Education in Kindergarten Promotes Fundamental Motor Skill Development

    10. http://www.livestrong.com/article/529108-what-are-the-benefits-of-physical-education-in-school/

    11. Do the Duration and Frequency of Physical Education Predict Academic Achievement, Self-concept, Social skills, Food consumption, and Body Mass Index?

     

     

    Add signature

  • Candidate: Mason Don Milligan (Bountiful: City Council)

    Utah Cultural Advocacy Alliance Grade: A+ (100%)

    • Candidate Name: Mason Don Milligan 
    • Your Municipality: Bountiful
    • Elected office for which you are running: City Council
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  • NEWSLETTER: UTAH DIVISION OF ARTS AND MUSEUMS PERFORMING ARTS NEWS (JULY)

    Performing Arts Newsletter
    View this email in your browser

    Greetings Utah Performing Arts Community

    I hope this finds you well. Visit the performing arts page of our website for more resources. Also, please let me know if you have any suggestions or are aware of resources that I should list.
    All the best, Jason Bowcutt801-236-7554.

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  • CALL FOR ENTRY: REQUEST FOR ARTIST QUALIFICATIONS (JUNE 30 DEADLINE)

    Dear Artists and Colleagues:

     
    Letters of interest and qualifications are requested from artists interested in creating art for the public area(s) of the new Department of Environmental Quality Technical Support Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Selection Committee will collaborate with an artist to develop an installation that reflects the important role the Department of Environmental Quality plays in safeguarding Utah’s air, land and water. 
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  • Job Posting: Joomla Developer

    Utah Humanities, a nonprofit organization located in Salt Lake City, Utah is looking for a contract/freelance Joomla developer to work with our team on an as-needed, hourly basis. This position allows for working remotely, but will require some in-person meetings.

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