UDAM - Visual Arts News

March 2017

EXHIBITIONS

THE GREAT GOOD PLACE
Alice Gallery
MAR 10 - MAY 5, 2017

Please join us for the Gallery Stroll reception April 21st,6-9pm

The Great Good Place exhibits the work of a group of emerging artists fascinated with the history of the two-dimensional image and its relentless search for an Arcadia or Utopia. The works exhibited will showcase how the individual artists attempt to reach their own form of escape and peace. Artists include Greg Caldwell, Aloe Corry, Pearl Corry, Madeline Rupard, David Raleigh, and Lim Kheng Saik.

“Whether the composed parlor paintings of the 19th century, the wild urgency of expressionism, or the intentional grittiness and mundanity of modern and post-modern painting, we observe that this pull never evades artists, even if the symbols and shapes surrounding it may change,” Rupard said. “This group exhibition will showcase the commonalities and also distinctions in how each artist attempts to reach their own ‘great good place’ through drawing and painting.”

The exhibit’s title echoes the short story by Henry James, which art critic Peter Schjeldahl described in a 2011 article for Frieze Magazine. “An overburdened man is somehow transported to an unremarkable, even rather dull, but friendly hotel or club; it’s a little monastery-like, at an unknown location. It refreshes him. His life back home improves,” Schjeldahl wrote. “Was it a dream? It’s not clear in the story. It doesn’t matter. I love James’s phrase, the Great Good Place: I think everyone has one. Yours is tailored to your particular sorrows and contradictions, which it soothes and resolves, and mine to mine, which it soothes and resolves. The humour, and the wisdom, in James’s story is that the protagonist’s haven....[is] nothing orgiastic or exalting. No dreams come true there. That’s in the nature of Great Good Places, I believe. They are not projections of our wishes. They are registrations, perhaps quite humble, of what we lack. They aren’t exciting. They are, however, greatly good.”
Image: Madeline Rupard, In Acadia, Acrylic on panel, 2017
THIS LAND
Utah State Capitol
DEC 22, 2016 - APR 21, 2017

This Land is an exhibition from the State of Utah Fine Art Collection. The works included range from the early 1900s to 2015 and feature important Utah artists such Ada C. Irvine, LeConte Stewart, V Douglas Snow, and Florence Ware, among many others. Read more here.
Image: JB Fairbanks, Sunset Behind Autumn Forest, Oil on canvas, n.d.

GRANTS


Arts Project Grants are open. These grants enable organizations and groups,whose primary mission may or may not be arts-based, to develop and provide unique arts-based projects to the general public. Funding Range: $500 to $2,000. Applications due March, 24, 2017. Additional grants are available. Visit our site for more information. 

ARTOPS


The Local section of ArtOps has multiple opportunities for exhibition across the state.

ArtOps is dedicated to bringing art opportunities to Utah artists. Opportunities are from local, national and international sources, and include exhibitions, residencies, funding, and professional development. 
SPECIFIC ABJECT
Rio Gallery
MAR 17 - MAY 12, 2017

Please join us for the Gallery Stroll reception March 17,6-9pm

The artists in this exhibition—Jared Clark, Christopher Lynn, Abraham Kimball, Allan Ludwig, Joseph Penrod, and Jean Richardson—each have a unique take on the possibilities of painting, or the possibilities of how painting’s mores can be used to frame other practices.

Painting as a term can be used to describe a medium-based artistic discipline, or as a lens through which work can be considered. Traditionally, painting’s primary components were its material (paint, canvas, panel, etc.), flat surface, location on the wall, and employment of color. During the 20th century, artists questioned the trappings of representational easel painting including traditional technique, the optics of space, shading, composition, and placement on the wall. As artists freed painting to be more non-representational, there was less focus on the illusion of space rendered on the flat surface of the canvas, and more focus on the actual surface of the canvas, and in turn, the physicality of the canvas itself. The depth of the stretcher bars, the angle at which the work hung on the wall (or placement on the floor), and the shape of the canvas were now fair game when considering a painting, and not just what sat within the discrete parameters of the frame.

Painting was no longer just a framed window into a different scene, but it was being talked about as a sculptural object. Consequently, sculpture was being considered as painting. Modernist sculpture eschewed the pale carved marble and dark cast bronze forms of yesteryear and would occasionally embrace flat planes, color, fixed vantage points from which to view the work, the locus of the wall, and linear elements—all previously seen as the distinct purview of painting.

Looking at an artwork through the lens of painting is to consider the work as painting, even if many of its elements do not sit neatly within painting’s core competencies. Conversely, looking at painting through the lenses of sculpture, performance, video, or other disciplines also reveals fertile ground to explore new opportunities.
Image: Christopher Lynn, Untitled (detail), Acrylic on cardboard, 2017

MOUNTAIN WEST ARTS CONFERENCE
MAY 4, 2017


We are happy to announce Aaron Dworkin as the Keynote Speaker for the 2017 Mountain West Arts Conference.
Named a 2005 MacArthur Fellow and President Obama’s first appointment to the National Council on the Arts, Aaron P. Dworkin serves as dean of the University of Michigan’s School of Music, Theatre & Dance, which is ranked among the top performing arts schools in the nation. He also founded The Sphinx Organization, a the leading national arts organization that transforms lives through the power of diversity and the arts. A multi-media performing artist, author, social entrepreneur, artist-­‐citizen, and educator, he continually receives extensive national recognition for his leadership and service to communities. Registration now open

PUBLIC ART OPPORTUNITY
DEADLINE: APR 7, 2017


The Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (UDABC) is constructing this new store in West Valley City at 5600 West 6200 South.The Art Committee intends to commission new work or purchase existing art. This public artwork may draw inspiration from or derive context from the community of West Valley City and/or the services offered by DABC, the architecture, the diverse cultures of West Valley City, the history and/or the magnificent Utah landscape. This project is open to artists residing in the western United States to include (Utah, Idaho, Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, California, Washington, Oregon, Montana and Wyoming.) 

This and more projects on our website.
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