The Future Isn't What It Used To Be @ UMOCA (Jan 27 - May 13)

 
 
 

IMMEDIATE RELEASE | JAN 10, 2016

 

MEDIA CONTACT 

Sarina Ehrgott

20 S West Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84101 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gisela Motta and Leandro Lima | I.E.D (Improvised Explosive Device), 2007 | Video still, 4', 5.1 surround sound 
Image courtesy of the artist 
 
 
 
UMOCA Presents The Future Isn't What It Used To Be
STREET & CODEC GALLERIES: JAN 27 - MAY 13
OPENING RECEPTION: FEB 3 | 7 PM


Salt Lake City, UT - Utah Museum of Contemporary Art (UMOCA) is proud to present the exhibition The Future Isn't What It Used To Be in the Street and Codec Galleries. Featured artists include: Octavio Abúndez, Ananké Asseff, Donna Conlon & Jonathan Harker, Rosa Naday Garmendia, Gisela Motta & Leandro Lima, Stephanie Syjuco, and Antonia Wright.

  
Curated by Susan Caraballo, The Future Isn't What It Used To Be is a collection work that examines violence and man-made atrocities, reflecting how the future before us looks bleak and far from what we had envisioned the 21st century to look like. Violence is prevalent in our modern day: It fills the media, our television programs, popular movies, and video games. We are continually fed images and stories of war, whether it be from Aleppo, state brutality in Venezuela, terrorist attacks in cities such as Nice, or mass shootings like the one at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando. Generation after generation grow up playing with toy guns, shooting in video games, and are desensitized by the influx of media. We seem to be immune to violence and violent scenes...that is, of course, until the violence affects us directly.
 
Without using explicit scenes, The Future Isn't What It Used To Be challenges its viewers to think about violence that humans have triggered and continue to inflict on the world. Crafted carefully so as to bring contemporary issues into question, Caraballo has created an exhibit that demands action and change from our society, and gives us the courage to create the future in which we want to live.
About Susan Caraballo
Susan Caraballo is an arts manager, producer and curator, and has worked with numerous art organizations and individual artists, primarily in South Florida, since 1996. From 1999-2006, she directed Artemis, a service and presenting non-profit arts organization that she founded whose mission was to support, develop, and tour South Florida-based artists. Caraballo has also worked with the Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation and the Contemporary Arts Project at Vizcaya Museum and Gardens. Most recently, she served as the Artistic Director at ArtCenter/South Florida and is the co-founder of FEAST Miami, a series of pop-up dinners hosted at art venues to financially support new and emerging creative projects. As a curator, Caraballo's interest lies in interdisciplinary performance-based work spanning from dance-theatre to performance installations as well as multimedia, conceptual work and installation. She has presented work in multiple disciplines including dance, film, music, performance, theatre, and visual arts. 
 
About the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art
The Utah Museum of Contemporary Art has been an award-winning aesthetic force and community leader since it was established in 1931. Located in the heart of downtown Salt Lake City, UMOCA encourages exploration into what it means to exist in today's world through art that inspires imagination, stimulates thought, and transforms society. The Museum connects people around the contemporary art practice of Utah and beyond to shape an engaged and thoughtful global citizenry. UMOCA strives to be a place where all points of view, experiences, and ages feel welcome to explore the pressing issues of our time through socially relevant art exhibitions and programming.
 
UMOCA is a five-time recipient of funding from the Andy Warhol Foundation and is a 2015 and 2016 recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts' Art Works grant award.
 
UMOCA is a 501c3 institution that is supported by public, foundation, and corporate gifts. Your donation in any amount is greatly appreciated, and admission is a suggested $5 donation. 

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